Disco Volante Mr. Bungle

Band t-shirts are the silent heroes in the music advertising world. Kids would wear band shirts proudly to tell the other kids at school that they were cool enough to go and see the band emblazoned on their chest the night before. But what did they wear to the concert? A different band’s t-shirt and listened to another different band as they waited in the parking lot for the show to start. Why? Because those are the rules.

MTV had a heavy hand in the gloved fist of pop culture influence in the early 90s. Careers were made and broken on MTV appearances. At the core of the channel (then, certainly not now), videos were played more than reruns of The Real World and Rock N’ Jock Softball Challenges. If your video was in heavy rotation, you were one of the cool bands. You got to play with John Norris and Kurt Loder on “Hangin’ With MTV” and do on-location interviews at water parks with Riki Rachtman or Kennedy. That’s how you knew you were selling out to the masses.

It seems that Mike Patton knew this when they were shooting Faith No More’s video for Epic” off of The Real Thing. Taking a cue from the corporate music whores that he had seen on MTV before him, he sported a Mr. Bungle t-shirt that had the band’s logo, some artwork, and the phrase, “There’s A Tractor In My Balls”. None of us knew what it meant, but we thought it was cool.

With the internet still in its infancy, dial-up speeds were either 14.4k/sec or amazingly fast at 28.8k/sec. Music news sites were still text-based and MP3 files were a glimmer in Shawn Fanning’s eye. The only other place to get music news was the latest copy of Circus Magazine. Back then, we thought it was cool and now we look on it as another corporate rag meant to sell you stuff.

Back to Mike Patton’s shirt…

Not in an instant, like we can today, I found out that Mr. Bungle was another band that he was involved in. I thought, “If he has enough time and talent to be in two bands at the same time, they both must be as awesome as the other!”

Boy was I wrong.

First album I picked up was Mr. Bungle. It honestly took me a number of years to realize how much of a genius Mike Patton was/is, particularly with John Zorn connected with the album. Then I bought Disco Volante when it came out, thinking I was getting into something similar to Mr. Bungle. Nope. Disco Volante is probably the most experimental album of the trio that were released by the band.

Tracks are broken up between the actual track names and hidden tracks. There are a couple of tracks on the album that are recognizable if you listen more than a couple of times. Most of it is just noise, but not in a bad way. It’s a great album to listen to if you don’t want to really pay attention to it but randomly find yourself tuning in as an active listener and then getting on with your life. You find yourself saying, “What the fuck was that noise?” and “Oh, that’s an interesting sound.”


 TrackArtistLength
1.Everyone I Went To High School With Is DeadMr. Bungle2:45
2.Chemical MarriageMr. Bungle3:10
3.Carry Stress In The JawMr. Bungle9:00
4.Desert Search For Techno AllahMr. Bungle5:24
5.Violenza DomesticaMr. Bungle5:14
6.After School SpecialMr. Bungle2:48
7.PhlegmaticsMr. Bungle3:17
8.Ma Meeshka Mow SkwozMr. Bungle6:07
9.The BendsMr. Bungle10:29
10.Backstrokin'Mr. Bungle2:28
11.PlatypusMr. Bungle5:08
12.Merry Go Bye ByeMr. Bungle12:58

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